Tuesday, April 29, 2008

T-shirt Slogans

I only have three t-shirts with words on them:

Just say no

More please

Words Department

I am quite careful where and when I wear them. I am aware that they may be confused with my opinion.

Now I don't particularly like clothes with words or logos on them although, because I do like expensive and fashionable clothes, sometimes logos are unavoidable. Words on T-shirts can be a bit like cartoon ties on businessmen. They suggest you only know one joke and keep telling it to death.

According to The Guardian last Wednesday feminist activist Jennifer Baumgardner caused a huge stir with a T-shirt she designed which said, 'I had an abortion,' and she has now produced one saying 'I was raped.'

Question. Do you believe people's T-shirts

8 comments:

Andy said...

I once got in to quite a bit of trouble at my previous church (and New Wine) for wearing a T-shirt with "Professional Pornstar" written on it.

It was, of course, deeply ironic, as I'm not a pornstar, paid or otherwise - and I actually wore it as a badge of honour that I wasn't a stuffy Christian removed from the world.

Still, it rightly put some people's backs up - and now doing work with people who struggle with porn (myself included) - I realise it wasn't the most helpful thing in the world.

That T-shirt, though, helped two friends towards Jesus and formed a lasting friendship with a couple of others who similarly felt a disconnect between Jesus and culture - so it wasn't a totally wasted experience :)

david said...

I remember at college that a girl had her name on her T-shirt. However, she became most upset if anybody followed the instruction written accross her breasts - PAT

Mike Peatman said...

I did wear my Father Dougal T-shirt once at New Wine.

Caption: "It's a priest thing, you wouldn't understand"

I could tell by people's faces that it wasn't going down that well with most of them. A few furtive smiles gave away the Father Ted fans, though.

St said...

Mike, I want one.

One of our venture leaders once wore a 'No knickers since 1938' T. She said it was a take on the Kickers advert but I hadn't seen that.

I don't feel it is my place to comment on the appropriateness or otherwise of women's clothing so I simply asked if she'd wear it to church. She said she would. That's Piccadilly for you.

Stewart said...

I don't feel it is my place to comment on the appropriateness or otherwise of women's clothing so I simply asked if she'd wear it to church. She said she would. That's Piccadilly for you.

Not only did she wear it to church (many times), but she once wore it while leading the service. No-one complained. And it was in Pimlico rather than Piccadilly, but you were close so I'll give you a point anyway.

St said...

Ah Pimlico. That explains everything.

Anonymous said...

Ah, the memories

Ojalanpoika said...

I've collected the best Christian T-shirts I found in here:
http://www.helsinki.fi/~pjojala/Christian_Shirts.html

Personally, I would prefer those apologetic figures such as Dinoglyfs documented by the ancient man few thousands years ago, as displayed in the site above. Unfortunately, they are not sold anywhere... Anyway, anyhow, this might be the Elder Wand you sought:
http://www.helsinki.fi/~pjojala/Dinoglyfs.htm

Do You happen to know a site for such "apolo-wear"?

A recent book "Understanding Intelligent Design" by ­William Dembski and Sean McDowell, son of Josh McDowell just became available last week.
http://www.uncommondescent.com/intelligent-design/understanding-intelligent-design-now-available-at-amazoncom/

The book is geared at Christian young people (junior high and high schoolers) as well as for Church groups (e.g., Sunday Schools) to help get out the word about ID, Intelligent Design. A MOST REVEALING INSIGHT FROM ITS FIRST CHAPTER:

"A few years back, skeptic Michael Shermer wrote a book called
How We Believe. For it he commissioned a poll of thousands of
people. He asked participants why other people believe in God. The
most popular answers focused on religious benefits: God comforts
us, provides the basis for living a moral life, gives purpose to our
lives, and is the source of meaningful religious experiences.
Then Shermer asked participants why they personally believe
in God. The number one answer changed drastically. The most
common response was the design and complexity of the world.
Our natural tendency, it would seem, is to believe the world was
designed."

Hunting the best T-shirt slogans,
Pauli.Ojala@gmail.com
evolutionary critic
Biochemist, drop-out so called
(MSci-Master of Sciing)
Helsinki, Finland